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Heightened Fire Risk Could Leave 24/680 Residents In The Dark

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Due to gusty winds and dry conditions, combined with a heightened fire risk, PG&E may need to turn off power for public safety at homes throughout the 24/680 over the next 36 to 48 hours.

PG&E is advising residents to prepare for outages that could last longer than 48 hours. Get the latest information on this event HERE.

Due to the forecasted extreme weather conditions, PG&E is considering proactively turning off power for safety, and implementing a Public Safety Power Shutoff, across portions of approximately 30 northern, central, coastal and Bay Area counties. Portions of counties that may be impacted include, but is not limited to: Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lake, Mariposa, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Tehama, Tuolumne, Yolo and Yuba.

The main period of weather risk is early Wednesday morning through Thursday midday. The dry, windy weather pattern is expected to reach from the northern portions of PG&E’s service territory and down through the Sacramento Valley before spreading into the central areas of the state including most of the Bay Area.

As part of PSPS preparedness efforts, PG&E is asking customers to:

  • Update their contact information at pge.com/mywildfirealerts or by calling 1-866-743-6589 during normal business hours. PG&E will use this information to alert customers through automated calls, texts, and emails, when possible, prior to, and during, a Public Safety Power Shutoff.
  •  Plan for medical needs like medications that require refrigeration or devices that need
    power.
  • Identify backup charging methods for phones and keep hard copies of emergency
    numbers.
  • Build or restock your emergency kit with flashlights, fresh batteries, first aid supplies and
    cash.
  • Keep in mind family members who are elderly, younger children and pets. Information
    and tips including a safety plan checklist are available at pge.com/wildfiresafety.

18 COMMENTS

  1. Its like we’re living in a 3rd world country now. But can you blame PG&E for takint these drastic measures, when everybody is going to sue them over everything, even forces of nature.

  2. This is going to bring down a lot of home security cameras and alarms. It will be interesting to see if the burglars come out to take advantage or if they’ll be stayhing home to.

  3. Has LPD / OPD / MPD / ConFire / OMFD evaluated whether the risks ostensibly mitigated by the PSPS justify the probabilistic public safety risks posed by the PSPS; e.g., traffic collisions due to signal disruption, physical hazards and opportunistic crime due to outdoor lighting disruption, medial device failure, telephone service interruption, or medication spoilage due to refrigeration disruption?

    Do municipalities or first responder agencies have any input with respect to PG&E’s decisions?

  4. Another tactic to get people to leave Califuctupia. No way – you can have our overtaxed house when you pry it from our cold, unheated fingers. We’re doing great!!

  5. Stores selling out of water and soup and charcoal and ice. Haven’t seen gas lines since the seventies. This is crazy.

  6. As I expected, information dissemination is starting to break down with conflicting info coming from officvial sources. What is news24680 going to do?

  7. Panic!! It’s scary. People are scary. Who are these people? Weirdest “emergency” I have lived through. In this emergency, I have hot and cold running water and natural gas for cooking, and people are scrambling to buy bottled water? It’s NOT logical. It’s panic. This is a man-made emergency. PGE can turn the power back on whenever it suits them, and the legal constraints permit it. The worst outcome is I have to toss a few hundred dollars’ worth of food, and I MAY not be able to get to work on time. What will people do in a real emergency? I’m beginning to think bomb shelter and heavy armaments. Is that wrong of me?

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